Local History

The Muncie-made forerunner of the “Vegematic”

Posted by: Karen M. Vincent on Thursday, January 23, 2014 at 4:00:00 pm

clientuploads/Blog/Local History/Jan 14/local-jan14.jpg

Many of you will remember the Vegematic, made by Ronco and heavily advertised on TV.  The promise was that “It slices, dices, chops and peels, makes thousands of julienne fries in seconds!” Well, to show that there is nothing new under the sun, Muncie had its own version of a similar kitchen specialty back in the early 1920s.

Read More

Santa Claus Photo

Posted by: Karen M. Vincent on Thursday, December 19, 2013 at 4:00:00 pm

clientuploads/Blog/Local History/December/dec-local.jpg

How could such a great, happy photograph come from a morgue? It can when it’s part of a collection of eighty boxes of archival material donated to Minnetrista in 2004 from Ball Memorial Hospital—now IU Health Ball Memorial Hospital.

Read More

Meeks Furniture “Comes Home” Part Two

Posted by: Karen M. Vincent on Thursday, November 21, 2013 at 4:00:00 pm

clientuploads/Blog/Local History/November/meek part 2.jpg

Last month I shared the story of my trip to Columbia, Missouri, to meet Louesa Danks and see her collection of Meeks furniture. Several years after this visit, Louesa’s friend, Jeanne, called to tell me that it was time to pick up the furniture.

Read More

Meeks Furniture “Comes Home”

Posted by: Karen M. Vincent on Thursday, October 17, 2013 at 2:00:00 pm

clientuploads/Blog/Local History/October/oct-local.jpg
In 1998, I got a telephone call from Louesa Danks, granddaughter of James Meeks of The Meeks Mortuary family. When I heard that she was interested in donating a large collection of Meeks furniture, then registrar Heather Davis and I immediately booked our flight to Columbia, Missouri.

Read More

Photo History: Glass Workers, Hartford City, ca. 1900

Posted by: Karen M. Vincent on Thursday, September 19, 2013 at 3:00:00 pm

clientuploads/Blog/Local History/sept-local-thumb.jpg
Look at the children in the front row of this group of glass workers. How old do you think they are? Eight or nine years old, maybe? While we would be horrified now to think of young children working in a glass factory—or any place, for that matter—it was common fewer than one hundred years ago.

Read More

What is this thing?

Posted by: Karen M. Vincent on Thursday, August 15, 2013 at 12:00:00 am

clientuploads/Blog/Local History/localhistory-july.jpg

Every now and then an object of mysterious function comes into the Minnetrista Heritage Collection. Often, the donor doesn’t know what it is, but just that they “found it when I cleaned out grandma’s basement.” We look through our reference books and search on-line. It is hard, however, to Google something when you have no idea at all what it is. 

Read More

Muncie’s ‘Meaty’ Past

Posted by: Karen M. Vincent on Thursday, July 18, 2013 at 5:00:00 pm

clientuploads/Blog/Local History/kuhner-thumbnail.jpg

It was located on Broadway Avenue in Muncie—now Martin Luther King Boulevard—and it smelled bad. At times, it smelled really bad. It was the meat packing company that started as Kuhner and closed many years later as Marhoefer.

Read More

Wizard of Oz Hat

Posted by: Karen M. Vincent on Thursday, June 20, 2013 at 12:00:00 am

clientuploads/Blog/Local History/oz_hat.jpg
In the late 1960s, Frances Petty Sargent and her late husband, Ed Petty, were in San Francisco shortly after MGM held an auction of stored properties. While shopping in a store on Ghiradelli Square, they purchased the Munchkin hat from that auction and, thus, began a hobby of collecting hats and other headgear that continued into the 1980s.

Read More

Port Glass Company of Muncie

Posted by: Karen M. Vincent on Thursday, May 16, 2013 at 12:00:00 am

clientuploads/Blog/portglassthumb.jpg
The next time you drive by Westside Park in Muncie, look to the north as you pass Hutchison Avenue. One hundred years ago, you wouldn’t have seen houses, trees or a nursing home. Instead, you would have seen Port Glass Works, a large operating glass factory, where hundreds of workers made fruit jars by hand...

Read More

Mason Jars are Fruit Jars, but not all Fruit Jars are Mason Jars

Posted by: Karen Vincent on Thursday, April 18, 2013 at 9:00:00 am

clientuploads/Blog/glass418_thumb.jpg
Several years ago, Minnetrista’s former curator of business and industrial history, Dick Cole, asked me if I knew what made a Mason jar a Mason jar. He was thoroughly surprised when I was able to tell him, because he knew that my main interest in our large collection of jars is the stories that they can tell. I am not an expert on closures and markings, although I’ve certainly learned a lot in my time at Minnetrista. I also know that I can call on Dick to answer my questions, because he loves to share his knowledge of fruit jars. Anyway, read on and you’ll know why Mason jars are fruit jars, but not all fruit jars are Mason jars...

Read More