Ball Family History

Lucina Amelia Ball – A Professional Woman Ahead of the Times

Posted by: Karen M. Vincent on Thursday, October 23, 2014 at 12:00:00 am

Lucina Ball did not hesitate to offer sisterly advice to her younger brothers—Lucius, William, Edmund, Frank, and George. In a letter written in 1892, she suggested that the brothers “… get up a ‘syndicate’ to buy a whole square and build it all equally good, and so make your own surroundings.” They took her advice then, as they so often did, and purchased a thirty-three acre tract on the White River.

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Lucy Ball’s Very Eventful Wedding

Posted by: Karen M. Vincent on Thursday, September 25, 2014 at 3:00:00 pm

It was a wild and wooly evening when Lucy Ball, oldest daughter of Frank C. and Elizabeth Brady Ball, married Alvin Owsley on May 16, 1925. The wedding was held at the home of the bride’s parents, just as her sister Margaret’s wedding was the previous year. The setting was lovely, the guests were many, and the bride and groom had their nerves under control. The weather, however, did not cooperate.

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A Ball Jar That Isn’t a Fruit Jar

Posted by: Karen M. Vincent on Thursday, August 28, 2014 at 12:00:00 am

 

Jars, jars, and more jars. In addition to more than 1,000 fruit jars, the Minnetrista Heritage Collections includes approximately 100 packer jars. So what is a packer jar? 

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Ball Brothers Company Sponsors a Canning Contest

Posted by: Karen M. Vincent on Thursday, July 31, 2014 at 3:00:00 pm

What a great idea! Give away a jar, encourage canning, and, of course, sell a few products. That’s exactly what Ball Brothers Company did for the International Canning Contests held during the 1930s.

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A Children’s Party That Wasn’t for Children

Posted by: Karen M. Vincent on Thursday, June 26, 2014 at 11:00:00 am

The very dapper George A. Ball dressed like a child for a party at his home! How could that be and why? According to Emily Kimbrough, in her delightful memoir of early 20th century Muncie, not only was George dressed in young boy’s clothing, Frances dressed like a little girl.

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The Town Bell Rang

Posted by: Karen M. Vincent on Thursday, May 29, 2014 at 10:00:00 am

When Ball Corporation moved headquarters to Colorado in 1998, the company donated its large collection of jars to Minnetrista. Ball chemist Dick Cole headed across town to Minnetrista instead of making the longer trip to Colorado. Why would Minnetrista hire a chemist? Dick’s work involved chemistry but his passion is the Ball jar, and he followed “his” jars here. Dick retired several years ago, but I still rely on his expertise. And, occasionally, I recycle stories that he shared. This is one.

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They Established a Hospital

Posted by: Karen M. Vincent on Thursday, April 24, 2014 at 4:00:00 pm

Several days ago, a Ball State University student asked to interview me for a video she was making for a journalism class. Her project was Muncie history, and she wanted to talk about the Ball family. One of her questions was “What impact, besides Ball State University, did the Ball family have on Muncie?” There are many ways that the family made an impact, but we’ll start with another institution that carries the name “Ball.”

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Lucius Styles Ball – Inventor

Posted by: Karen M. Vincent on Thursday, March 27, 2014 at 5:00:00 pm

I bet that, in his wildest dreams, Lucius S. Ball, father of the Ball brothers, never thought that he’d be featured in a museum in Weil am Rhein, Germany. Yet he is.

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Alvah L. Bingham

Posted by: Karen M. Vincent on Wednesday, February 26, 2014 at 4:00:00 pm

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Alvah was just one of several Bingham family members who made considerable contributions to the success of Ball Brothers Company.

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A Story Debunked

Posted by: Karen M. Vincent on Thursday, January 30, 2014 at 4:00:00 pm

 

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For almost 25 years, Minnetrista staff told visitors a passed-down story about the Dr. Lucius L. Ball family home. The story goes that Lucius didn’t build his family’s home but, instead, purchased an existing farmhouse that faced Wheeling Pike (now Wheeling Avenue) and, around 1910, rotated it 180 degrees in order for it to face the river like the rest of the homes. Turns out, the story isn’t entirely true.

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