Blog

Before there were Ball jars there were five Ball brothers

Posted by: Karen Vincent on Thursday, March 28, 2013 at 9:00:00 am

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If it wasn’t for the Ball fruit jar, Minnetrista wouldn’t exist. That humble jar, so important to food preservation, generated an industry that put Muncie on the map and provided the Ball family with the wherewithal to give back to their community, particularly in the form of Ball Memorial Hospital, Ball State University and, later, Minnetrista...

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The Discovery of Natural Gas Changes the Face of East Central Indiana

Posted by: Karen M. Vincent on Thursday, March 21, 2013 at 9:00:00 am

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Before the discovery of the Trenton Gas Field in the late 19th century, East Central Indiana was almost exclusively an agricultural area. The Gas Boom became a defining moment in the development of the region. Natural gas had an enormous impact on the history, culture, and life of the region and produced a period of economic growth, marked by a dramatic surge in the number of energy-dependent industries that took advantage of the relatively cheap source of fuel to build new factories in the area. Principal among these industries was the manufacturing of glass...

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Garden Update: Minnetrista in March

Posted by: Cassie Banning on Thursday, March 14, 2013 at 9:00:00 am

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March is a busy month.  Apple trees are getting their annual maintenance pruning, branches are being cut for a project on the riverbank, and early spring flowers are blooming!

This is the time of year when the Minnetrista gardeners get out on ladders and cut off all of the flexible, tall upright growth that grew last year on the apple trees. None of this growth will produce fruit and will only shade the branches that will produce apples this coming fall. The Minnetrista gardeners and I try to get this work done every year before the leaves start to grow, and you should too if you have apple trees at home...

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Ashley Introduces Herself and The Food Preservation Blog

Posted by: Ashley Lichtenbarger on Thursday, March 7, 2013 at 9:00:00 am

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Welcome to my blog! “Who are you?” you may ask? Well, I’m Ashley Lichtenbarger, Minnetrista’s education manager, here to bring canning tips and techniques straight to you. I am also a crafter, canner, walker, and owner of an adorable dog. She’s a Heinz 57—a new breed I came up with just for her! Now, as much as I’d love this blog to be all about my dog, we have other things to talk about…

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Eat Whatís in Season. Cook Whatís in Season

Posted by: Paige Vandoski, Social Media Intern on Wednesday, August 22, 2012 at 10:00:00 am

Want to eat what’s in season? Although summer is winding down, there will still be some produce that will probably be overflowing at your local market! The August in-season picks are:

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Fix your drought-stressed lawn

Posted by: Steve Scott, Grounds Supervisor on Monday, August 20, 2012 at 10:00:00 am

The summer of 2012 has been one brutal summer for you lawn. The combination of high temperatures and a lack of rainfall has done its number on many lawns across the Central Indiana area.  With the return of rain, we have seen many lawns green up quickly, however, others are still showing signs of distress from the drought...

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Whatís the Big Deal About Buying at a Farmerís Market?

Posted by: Paige Vandoski, Social Media Intern on Friday, August 17, 2012 at 2:00:00 pm

What’s the Big Deal About Buying at a Farmer’s Market? by Paige Vandoski

Tomatoes, zucchini, eggplant, watermelon, carrots, basil, chicken, bread… Can’t you find all this stuff at the regular grocery store? Well, superstores like Walmart and Meijer probably do carry these things, but why is it better to buy them at a local Farmer’s Market? If you’ve been to a Farmer’s Market, you probably already know that the fruits, veggies, herbs, meat, and home-baked goods are bursting with more flavor, are more sustainable, and the overall experience of strolling around on a warm summer day while conversing with people from the community is so much more rewarding. If you are a regular Farmer’s Market attendee or know nothing about them, I hope this list I’ve compiled is a refreshing, insightful look on why your next food run should be to your local Farmer’s Market J not those superstores!

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Feeding the Ducks?

Posted by: Stephanie Dilk, Education Manager on Wednesday, August 1, 2012 at 12:00:00 am

Is duck feeding a sound practice? For those of you who have a pond around your home, or who visit a local pond at a park or even the “duck pond” at Ball State University, I thought you might find this question relevant to your own choices. After speaking with some great people from the Indiana Department of Natural Resources, as well as doing some reading of my own, I made some fascinating discoveries...

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Things to Consider When Designing Your Garden

Posted by: Paige Vandoski, Social Media Intern on Tuesday, July 24, 2012 at 12:00:00 am

Is there more to putting a garden together besides simply picking pretty plants? You bet! When considering overall garden design: plant placementformcolor and leaf texture all play a vital role in giving a garden a dazzling appearance...

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Mourning Jewelry

Posted by: Nadia Kousari, Collections Specialist on Tuesday, July 10, 2012 at 10:00:00 am

In the United States, the Civil War (1861-1865) and economic hardship was taking its toll. Death in the war, high infant mortality, and the hardships of the time all contributed to a communal sense of loss. It was more common to experience death in oneís family than not. During these difficult times, mourning jewelry served as tokens of remembrance and affection.Perhaps one of the most unusual trends of the Victorian era, by todayís standards, is the notion of public mourning. The acceptance of public mourning in Europe was prompted by the death of Prince Albert in 1861. The years following his death were marked by ...